Author: olamideadio

To properly question the new edict on Nollywood by the Nigerian Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed, we must answer an important question: is art a reflection of society or an influence on it? It is an interesting question because the answer can fall either way—think “which comes before, the chicken or the egg?” question. Just like that glib chicken and egg riddle, there is an obvious answer to our art question here. It is a question of survival; can art exist without society? No. The purpose of art has never been to instruct society, but to reflect shades…

Read More

What strikes one at the start of Jeen-Yuhs: A Kanye Trilogy is the brutal intimacy it affords. You get the sense—very early—that a truth is about to be revealed. Not insistently about the artist, but something more generic, a basic, fundamental human truth. So, we open in the early 2000s with Coodie Simmons, a young director from Chicago who has found himself amongst exciting talents. One of them is a vibrant, charismatic kid named Kanye West who, at the time, was one of the best music producers in the industry. But Coodie sees that there is something more to the…

Read More

Anyone familiar with the “Uncharted” video game series developed by Naughty Dog for the PlayStation would have been hyped up for the movie adaptation, Uncharted. It stars Mark Wahlberg as Victor Sullivan, the crook; Tom Holland (Spider-Man) as Nathan Drake, the protagonist; while Sam Drake, Nathan’s brother, is portrayed by Rudy Pankov. While the intelligent, sometimes blood-pumping video games have attained a cult status among gamers, it is highly unlikely that the movie will get anywhere near that pedigree. The Uncharted movie is lively and fast-paced and even excellent in some moments, but it is not genuine in any way.…

Read More

Once again, the love bells ring. It is the time of great romantic testimonies for lovers and the enablement of those by our internet-driven relationships; the uncountable valentine packages; and the doe-eyed meetings of lovers-to-be. However, there are those who shan’t have the privilege of doubling up with a partner and also those who do have a partner and simply want to see a love story happen with them, quietly at home. There is a film for everyone. Why is this list special? It is entirely homemade. These are films about lovers in Nigerian contexts, and, primarily, films about the…

Read More

L.U.N.A. is a 2021 short directed by Blake Vaz and written by Roman Arabia and Mike Bane. Field technician, Lilian Romero, is sent out to diagnose an error from her company’s home assistant device L.U.N.A. Upon her arrival at the house, she finds that things are eerily out of place. The house holds a dark secret that neither she nor the occupants can fathom. Short Film Review: Fatimah Binta Gimsay’s ‘Ijo’ At the heart of L.U.N.A. is a contemporary technological horror married with traditional scares. The artificial assistant has been possessed not by a virus, but by a spiritual…

Read More

By the middle of the 20th century, the German poet and playwright, Bertolt Brecht, had perfected the Epic Theatre movement. It is a theatre technique that avoids illusions by constantly disrupting the audience’s suspension of disbelief. In Brechtian plays, the actor speaks directly to the audience, often analysing the events of the play with them and the elements of illusion like costume changes, make-up, are carried out before the audience. The purpose is to disenchant the audience, have them remain logical, and associate the play with real life as much as possible. Since theatre is the forerunner of cinema, it…

Read More

Vaillante is a UNICEF mini-series about the horrors of child-marriage in sub-Saharan Africa. It features new actors (Maguy Essey and Mouna Loueke) from across the continent and was shot by a South African production team. The 3-episode series, written and directed by Tom and James Collins, is available on UNICEF’s YouTube channel. Vaillante character poster. Via UNICEF/Rooftop Production Sali (Maguy Essey) has missed her graduation because she is on an outreach mission in a village to speak with the bereaved mother of a dead child-wife. The thirteen-year-old died giving birth to a baby. Sali has numerous cases of this nature.…

Read More

Perhaps not. Maybe, as some have rightly hypothesized, we have given the audience far too much credit than deserved. After all, there is no proper yardstick to measure this audience’s intelligence or to prove that it expects anything great of its industry. What we have is an audience that has become comfortable with mediocrity and has accepted it consistently from its filmmakers—from the director to every department involved in the process. When our filmmakers went on that infamous streak of replicating the format of the box office hit film, The Wedding Party 2, directed by Niyi Akinmolayan, the audience defended…

Read More

The Girl in the Yellow Jumper is a Ugandan film that follows the bizarre experiences of a hitchhiker, Jim (Michael Wawuyo Jr), given a ride by a police officer, Patrick (Maurice Kirya). Jim was kidnapped and recounts his experiences to the officer on the long ride from the deserted road back to the city. The film is written and directed by Loukman Ali, an eclectic filmmaker, evidenced in the various narrative styles in the film. Related: The 10 Best Nollywood Movies of 2021 Official poster. Via Netflix The beauty of the story—Uganda’s first film on Netflix, and an ambitious project…

Read More